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Plymouth Sloe Gin

30.90

Although the sloe grows throughout Europe, the English sloe remains the most popular. As October approaches, the shrubs are loaded with fruit, the sloes are then picked by hand, a thorny business to say the least! It takes four months to make this liqueur whose taste and color are all natural. The sloes are gently left to infuse in Plymouth Gin and then water and sugar are added, which gives Plymouth Sloe Gin its special balance. According to tradition, the sloes must be pricked before maceration to release the intensity of the aromas… not with a fork, but with a silver spit! The established method, however, is to use a blackthorn.

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Description

Although the sloe grows throughout Europe, the English sloe remains the most popular. As October approaches, the shrubs are loaded with fruit, the sloes are then picked by hand, a thorny business to say the least! It takes four months to make this liqueur whose taste and color are all natural. The sloes are gently left to infuse in Plymouth Gin and then water and sugar are added, which gives Plymouth Sloe Gin its special balance. According to tradition, the sloes must be pricked before maceration to release the intensity of the aromas… not with a fork, but with a silver spit! The established method, however, is to use a blackthorn.

Nose: Clear, velvety sloe, followed by sweet notes of cherry and almonds.

Palate: Soft, fruity and generous, a beautiful harmony between mellowness and acidity.

Overall: Long, fresh and fruity.

Plymouth Sloe Gin is drunk neat, on ice or in cocktails.

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1.31kg

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Plymouth Gin is part of the history of spirits by being the first spirit to have received the name "Dry Gin" when it was created in 1793. In 1896, Plymouth appeared in the "Savoy Cocktail Book" as the benchmark gin of the first recipe for "Dry Martini", more commonly known as "Marguerite". A new generation of mixologists are today revisiting this heritage and perpetuating the creation of neo-classic cocktails.

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